THINK AGAIN

65 or older? The risk of hospitalization with pneumococcal pneumonia is at least 6X* greater than adults aged 18–49.1

Even if you are healthy,1 age is one of the risk factor for catching pneumococcal pneumonia.1,2
That is because as we age, our immune systems naturally weaken, making it harder to fight off infections like pneumococcal pneumonia.3

Once the bacteria invade the lungs and bloodstream, they can cause serious illness.2

65 or older? You may be at greater
risk for pneumococcal pneumonia.1,4

Here is why. Because our immune system weakens with age, it is harder for our bodies to fight off infections and diseases like pneumococcal pneumonia3, even for healthy adults.4

RISK FOR HOSPITALIZATION WITH PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA INCREASES WITH AGE.1

  • Age 50-64
  • Age 65 and above

KNOW YOUR RISK

What is your age?

YOU ANSWERED: 18–49

May not be at risk based on age alone.1,4

Age alone may not put you at risk now, but it's important to remember the risk for pneumococcal pneumonia increases with age.1,4

GO BACK

YOU ANSWERED: 50–64

May be at risk based on age.1,4

Age is one of the risk factors for pneumococcal pneumonia. Even healthy adults as young as 50 may be at risk.1,4

GO BACK

YOU ANSWERED: 65 and above

May be at increased risk based on age.1,4

Age is one of the risk factors for pneumococcal pneumonia, and even healthy adults 65 years or older are at increased risk for pneumococcal disease.1,4

GO BACK

ɫGreater risk compared to healthy adults aged 18-491

*Depend on risk groups (healthy; adults included those without evidence of any high-risk or at-risk condition, at risk; adults included those who were immunocompetent with 1 or more chronic medical conditions or high risk ; adults included those who were immunocompromised or had a cochlear implant)1

Chronic conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, heart disease, and diabetes may increase pneumococcal pneumonia risk.1,4

Chronic conditions can make people more vulnerable to potentially serious illnesses like pneumococcal pneumonia.1,4

CERTAIN CHRONIC CONDITIONS INCREASE RISK IN ADULTS AGED 65 AND ABOVE+4
7.7X
LUNG DISEASE
(INCLUDE COPD)
5.9X
ASTHMA
3.8X
HEART DISEASE
2.8X
DIABETES
*Compared to healthy adults aged 65 and above

KNOW YOUR RISK

Do you have any chronic conditions (e.g., COPD, asthma, heart disease, and diabetes) or a weakened immune system?

YOU ANSWERED: YES

May be at risk based on chronic conditions.1,4

Chronic conditions like COPD, asthma, heart disease, and diabetes can increase the risk for pneumococcal pneumonia.1,4

GO BACK

YOU ANSWERED: NO

May not be at risk based on chronic conditions alone.1,4

Although you may not be at risk due to chronic conditions,1 it is important to remember that one of the risk factors for pneumococcal pneumonia is age.1,4

GO BACK

*COPD (Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)

Smoking damages fragile lung tissue, making the lungs more vulnerable to infection.5

When lung tissue is damaged by smoking, there is a higher risk of infection by the bacteria that cause pneumococcal pneumonia.5

 

KNOW YOUR RISK

Do you smoke?

YOU ANSWERED: YES

May be at risk.2,4

Certain lifestyle factors, such as smoking, can damage the fragile tissue lining the lungs.5 This makes the lung more vulnerable to pneumococcal pneumonia.5

GO BACK

YOU ANSWERED: NO

May not be at risk.4

While you may not be at risk,4 it is important to remember that even healthy adults aged 65 or older are at increased risk for pneumococcal pneumonia.1,4

GO BACK

*Depend on risk groups (healthy; adults included those without evidence of any high-risk or at-risk condition, at risk; adults included those who were immunocompetent with 1 or more chronic medical conditions or high risk ; adults included those who were immunocompromised or had a cochlear implant)1

References

1. Pelton.SI, et al. Decline in Pneumococcal Disease Attenuated in Older Adults and Those With Comorbidities Following Universal Childhood PCV13 Immunization. CID 2019;68(11):1831–8

2. National heart and lung and blood institute -Pneumonia 2016 https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/pneumonia ( accessed 6th Aug 2020)

3. Brooks L, Mias G. Streptococcus pneumoniae’s Virulence and Host Immunity: Aging, Diagnostics, and Prevention. Front Immunol. 2018;9. doi:10.3389/fimmu.2018.01366

4. Shea KM, et al. Rates of Pneumococcal Disease in Adults With Chronic Medical Conditions.Open Forum Infect Dis. 2014 May 27;1(1):ofu024

5. Baskaran et al. Effect of tobacco smoking on the risk of developing community acquired pneumonia: A systematic review and meta-analysisPLOS ONE 2019 14(7): e0220204